Shameless Self-Promotion for Writers, Pt.2

At the beginning of last month, I did a post called Shameless Self-Promotion for Writers. It was a post that allowed fellow writers to self-promote anything they wanted to – their blogs, their books, writing, an article they liked, etc.

I’m still amazed by the amount of comments that post got (and still gets) every day. The post now has over 200 comments and I think everyone appreciated the opportunity to promote their work, guilt free!

It’s time for Shameless Self-Promotion for writers, PART TWO!

So… this is a free for all post. Leave a comment and say whatever you want to say. Promote your book, call people to your blog, leave an inspirational quote, have a rant… whatever!

This blog has around 3,500 followers , so lets share our work, show everyone what we’ve been up to and just generally talk about this wonderful thing we call writing.

About Jodie @ Words Read & Written

Book blogger & aspiring author.
This entry was posted in Blogging and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

238 Responses to Shameless Self-Promotion for Writers, Pt.2

  1. roberteggleton says:

    As a survivor of child maltreatment, nothing paranormal was attributed with “causing” child abuse in my novel, Rarity from the Hollow. There is no excuse for abusing a child, or anybody else. There may be correlates relevant to treatment, such as mental illness of the parent (i.e. bipolar disorder), medication noncompliance by a mentally ill parent, past victimizations of the perpetrator, subcultural values (“spare the rod and spoil the child”), poverty (i.e., prostituting a child or selling a child to meet a family’s basic needs), lack of familial support systems (overwhelmed parents most common in cases involving children with disabilities), as examples. As a therapist involved both with victims, like myself, and perpetrators, these correlates cannot justify evil actions.

    The paranormal aspects of the above cited novel related to treatment of child abuse, presented as fictional (but possible). After her death, Faith, Lacy Dawn’s best friend, becomes a ghost who had to help resolve the above noted correlates of family dysfunction in order to remain eligible for continued existence within an absurd universe. An alien was required by Lacy Dawn to implement a successful family treatment plan before she would accept her predestined fate as the prototypical Savior of the economic structure of the universe. In reality, half of author proceeds from the Lacy Dawn Adventures Project have been donated to Children’s Home Society of West Virginia (I worked there in the 1980s as the Director of Shelter Care — emergency shelters for children.).

    Following are some book review excerpts. The most recent review of Rarity from the Hollow was published last week and it serves as supplement my above comments if you follow the link. Complete copies of these and other reviews are available on request. Thanks for your interest in emergence of art.

    2014 Book Review of Rarity from the Hollow by The Electric Review: A Universe On the Edge | Electric Review

    Past book reviews by professionals:

    In Baryonline 103, Barry Hunter concluded his review: “… I can almost hear a blue grass version of Metallica while reading this. I expect to see more from Eggleton and Lacy Dawn. Good satire is hard to find and science fiction satire is even harder to find.” Mia, a book reviewer for Coffee Times Romance concluded her review: “…But I was surprised that as I read more of the book, the people had a way of touching a part of you that I was not expecting at all. A good read for any lover of satire and science fiction. A well written book.” After stating that Rarity from the Hollow was one of the most unusual books that he had read in a long time, Darrell Bain, 2005 Fictionwise Ebook Author of the Year and 2007 Double Eppie Award Winner, closed his review with, “…You’ll enjoy the ride with Lacy Dawn and friends and family, but don’t expect the ride to be without bumps and enough food for thought to last you a long time.”

    Similarly, author William DeVault said in his review, “…one of those strange and exciting bits of literature that captures you with its uniqueness and then lingers on your mind, reasserting itself from time to time to remind you that your reality may not be everyone else’s. A rich and original work, full of aspects and images that are certain to make it worth recommending to friends you wish to impress. Not for everyone, but for those ready to embrace the offbeat, a welcome surprise.”

    J.D. Nelson, poet, MadVerse, compared the writing to both Stephen King and Ray Bradbury (big compliments): “Eggleton counters the story’s dark mood with touches of warmth and humor, � la Ray Bradbury. .. His frank and honest portrayal of poverty in rural Appalachia is reminiscent of Stephen King’s use of ‘everyday horrors’….”

    Kevin Patrick Mahoney on Authortrek compared it to Dean Koontz (!!!): “…the subject matter is dark and strong, unflinching in its portrayal of human darkness, and not for the faint-hearted or easily offended. Robert Eggleton is not afraid of employing complex style and structure to fit the needs of his story. The mixture of sci-fi, gritty reality, humour, and the mode of thriller reminds me a great deal of Dean Koontz’s writing, and Robert Eggleton may indeed have the potential to follow in Dean Koontz’s footsteps.”

    Evelyn Somers, Editor, The Missouri Review didn’t compare it to any works by others but echoed Mahoney: “Among its strengths are an ultra-convincing depiction of the lives, especially the inner lives, of the Appalachian characters. The grim details of their existence are delivered with such flat understatement that at times they almost become comic. And just when you think enough is enough, this world is too plain ugly, Lacy Dawn’s father (who is being “fixed” with DotCom’s help) gets a job and Lacy Dawn, her mother and her dog take off for a trip to the mall “out of state” with Lacy Dawn’s android friend, now her “fiance” (though as Lacy’s mother points out, he doesn’t have any private parts, not even “a bump.”) In the space between a few lines we go from hardscrabble realism to pure sci-fi/fantasy. It’s quite a trip.”

    Adicus Ryan Garton, publisher of Atomjack Science Fiction Magazine said it was the Wizard of Oz (L. Frank Baum) and Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy (Douglas Adams) smashed together. I was elated as Hitchhikers is my favorite all time novel. Mr. Garton found that
    “…There is so much to this story, and its writing is so unblinkingly honest…spares us nothing…her father beating her and her mother, the emotions…the dark creeping insanity that eats away at her Iraq-veteran father, and the life in general of people too poor, too uneducated to escape. In part, it is a grueling exposition of what children endure when …abused. …the only way…to escape is to learn that she is the savior… strong, tough, smart—all those attributes that any child should have—and she reminds us that children are survivors, adaptive and optimistic.

    But don’t think you’re going to be reading something harsh and brutal and tragic. This book is laugh-out-loud funny at times, satiric of almost everything it touches upon…The characters from the hollow and from the planet Shptiludrp (the Mall of the Universe) are funny almost to the point of tears.

    …It’s absolutely fantastic….”

    Now, my writing has been compared to Kurt Vonnegut’s style! Please check out the above cited review link. Thanks.

    Lacy Dawn Adventures

    Like

  2. roberteggleton says:

    As a survivor of child maltreatment, nothing paranormal was attributed with “causing” child abuse in my novel, Rarity from the Hollow. There is no excuse for abusing a child, or anybody else. There may be correlates relevant to treatment, such as mental illness of the parent (i.e. bipolar disorder), medication noncompliance by a mentally ill parent, past victimizations of the perpetrator, subcultural values (“spare the rod and spoil the child”), poverty (i.e., prostituting a child or selling a child to meet a family’s basic needs), lack of familial support systems (overwhelmed parents most common in cases involving children with disabilities), as examples. As a therapist involved both with victims, like myself, and perpetrators, these correlates cannot justify evil actions.

    The paranormal aspects of the above cited novel related to treatment of child abuse, presented as fictional (but possible). After her death, Faith, Lacy Dawn’s best friend, becomes a ghost who had to help resolve the above noted correlates of family dysfunction in order to remain eligible for continued existence within an absurd universe. An alien was required by Lacy Dawn to implement a successful family treatment plan before she would accept her predestined fate as the prototypical Savior of the economic structure of the universe. In reality, half of author proceeds from the Lacy Dawn Adventures Project have been donated to Children’s Home Society of West Virginia (I worked there in the 1980s as the Director of Shelter Care — emergency shelters for children.).

    Following are some book review excerpts. The most recent review of Rarity from the Hollow was published last week and it serves as supplement my above comments if you follow the link. Complete copies of these and other reviews are available on request. Thanks for your interest in emergence of art.

    2014 Book Review of Rarity from the Hollow by The Electric Review: A Universe On the Edge | Electric Review

    Past book reviews by professionals:

    In Baryonline 103, Barry Hunter concluded his review: “… I can almost hear a blue grass version of Metallica while reading this. I expect to see more from Eggleton and Lacy Dawn. Good satire is hard to find and science fiction satire is even harder to find.” Mia, a book reviewer for Coffee Times Romance concluded her review: “…But I was surprised that as I read more of the book, the people had a way of touching a part of you that I was not expecting at all. A good read for any lover of satire and science fiction. A well written book.” After stating that Rarity from the Hollow was one of the most unusual books that he had read in a long time, Darrell Bain, 2005 Fictionwise Ebook Author of the Year and 2007 Double Eppie Award Winner, closed his review with, “…You’ll enjoy the ride with Lacy Dawn and friends and family, but don’t expect the ride to be without bumps and enough food for thought to last you a long time.”

    Similarly, author William DeVault said in his review, “…one of those strange and exciting bits of literature that captures you with its uniqueness and then lingers on your mind, reasserting itself from time to time to remind you that your reality may not be everyone else’s. A rich and original work, full of aspects and images that are certain to make it worth recommending to friends you wish to impress. Not for everyone, but for those ready to embrace the offbeat, a welcome surprise.”

    J.D. Nelson, poet, MadVerse, compared the writing to both Stephen King and Ray Bradbury (big compliments): “Eggleton counters the story’s dark mood with touches of warmth and humor, � la Ray Bradbury. .. His frank and honest portrayal of poverty in rural Appalachia is reminiscent of Stephen King’s use of ‘everyday horrors’….”

    Kevin Patrick Mahoney on Authortrek compared it to Dean Koontz (!!!): “…the subject matter is dark and strong, unflinching in its portrayal of human darkness, and not for the faint-hearted or easily offended. Robert Eggleton is not afraid of employing complex style and structure to fit the needs of his story. The mixture of sci-fi, gritty reality, humour, and the mode of thriller reminds me a great deal of Dean Koontz’s writing, and Robert Eggleton may indeed have the potential to follow in Dean Koontz’s footsteps.”

    Evelyn Somers, Editor, The Missouri Review didn’t compare it to any works by others but echoed Mahoney: “Among its strengths are an ultra-convincing depiction of the lives, especially the inner lives, of the Appalachian characters. The grim details of their existence are delivered with such flat understatement that at times they almost become comic. And just when you think enough is enough, this world is too plain ugly, Lacy Dawn’s father (who is being “fixed” with DotCom’s help) gets a job and Lacy Dawn, her mother and her dog take off for a trip to the mall “out of state” with Lacy Dawn’s android friend, now her “fiance” (though as Lacy’s mother points out, he doesn’t have any private parts, not even “a bump.”) In the space between a few lines we go from hardscrabble realism to pure sci-fi/fantasy. It’s quite a trip.”

    Adicus Ryan Garton, publisher of Atomjack Science Fiction Magazine said it was the Wizard of Oz (L. Frank Baum) and Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy (Douglas Adams) smashed together. I was elated as Hitchhikers is my favorite all time novel. Mr. Garton found that
    “…There is so much to this story, and its writing is so unblinkingly honest…spares us nothing…her father beating her and her mother, the emotions…the dark creeping insanity that eats away at her Iraq-veteran father, and the life in general of people too poor, too uneducated to escape. In part, it is a grueling exposition of what children endure when …abused. …the only way…to escape is to learn that she is the savior… strong, tough, smart—all those attributes that any child should have—and she reminds us that children are survivors, adaptive and optimistic.

    But don’t think you’re going to be reading something harsh and brutal and tragic. This book is laugh-out-loud funny at times, satiric of almost everything it touches upon…The characters from the hollow and from the planet Shptiludrp (the Mall of the Universe) are funny almost to the point of tears.

    …It’s absolutely fantastic….”

    Now, my writing has been compared to Kurt Vonnegut’s style! Please check out the above cited review link. Thanks.

    Lacy Dawn Adventures

    Like

  3. roberteggleton says:

    Above link didn’t seem to work. Try this: http://electricrev.net/2014/08/12/a-universe-on-the-edge/

    Like

  4. roberteggleton says:

    Above link didn’t seem to work. Try this: http://electricrev.net/2014/08/12/a-universe-on-the-edge/

    Like

  5. oneoklock says:

    I’m Donna, and my blog is “sexypast60.com”. I have a FB page called Sick and Tired and Sexy, to tie in with my book of the same title.
    Live a Beautiful Life with Chronic Illness. Ideas? Info? Contact me

    Like

    • roberteggleton says:

      Since the link made it thru censorship, moderation, I guess that I’ll comment again. A very funny SF satirical essay about this topic was published in 2006. A few copies of Wingspan Quarterly, a now defunct but totally exception print magazine, is still available (I think) from Barnes and Noble. It is “I Found God in Cyberspace.” Rarity from the Hollow — work like you were hanging shingles on a leaky roof in the summer.

      Like

  6. oneoklock says:

    I’m Donna, and my blog is “sexypast60.com”. I have a FB page called Sick and Tired and Sexy, to tie in with my book of the same title.
    Live a Beautiful Life with Chronic Illness. Ideas? Info? Contact me

    Like

    • roberteggleton says:

      Since the link made it thru censorship, moderation, I guess that I’ll comment again. A very funny SF satirical essay about this topic was published in 2006. A few copies of Wingspan Quarterly, a now defunct but totally exception print magazine, is still available (I think) from Barnes and Noble. It is “I Found God in Cyberspace.” Rarity from the Hollow — work like you were hanging shingles on a leaky roof in the summer.

      Like

  7. ernieluis says:

    This is an awesome idea. Thanks you!
    If anyone’s interested, I have some free reading for y’all. Hope you enjoy.

    http://ernieluis.com/free-reading/alternate/

    Like

    • roberteggleton says:

      Writers are a very hard sell as readers. One that I have corresponded with wouldn’t even use the internet and sent me snail mail. Since he was famous I folded his letters into one of his paperbacks that I owned, but that, truthfully, totally sucked. This novel, of course, sold a bunch. While I will continue to post her and there with new reviews of Rarity from the Hollow or subsequent release, my recommendation is to not expect much except ego centrism, a waste of your time with respect to sales, but don’t be discouraged, Margaret, Maybe, so far, your work has not been recognized by anyone that actually counts. If there is something in your 11 titles worth noting, it will. If not, please keep on writing. I have received glowing reviews by people that count for Rarity from the Hollow, but sales have been low. It’s okay. It is history beyond my too soon demise that counts. The only thing that I feel a little guilty about, since I tried so hard, not just writing, that was easy, but with promotions, was that I didn’t raise more money to prevent child abuse, the mission of Lacy Dawn Adventures. This very popular guy, John Scalzi, ruined my reputation by his ignorance of this mission, compounded by a guy with the same name, Bob Eggleton, that I didn’t know was involved in the genre. He had the same name as me, so I was force to change mine. Scalzi posted comment like I was a fraud, even though I’d never heard of the other “Bob.” in 2006 when my first novel was originally published. Good stuff has happened since, but I recommend that you search your name an avoid the same pitfalls that name can impact. Good luck and please be real! If you produce something worth recognition by a non-paid professional editor, I will check it out. I am not interested in reader reviews, self promotion, or anything that has cost you one penny to publish for any reason — that’s not how true art works.

      Love, bob, now robert.

      Like

  8. ernieluis says:

    This is an awesome idea. Thanks you!
    If anyone’s interested, I have some free reading for y’all. Hope you enjoy.

    http://ernieluis.com/free-reading/alternate/

    Like

    • roberteggleton says:

      Writers are a very hard sell as readers. One that I have corresponded with wouldn’t even use the internet and sent me snail mail. Since he was famous I folded his letters into one of his paperbacks that I owned, but that, truthfully, totally sucked. This novel, of course, sold a bunch. While I will continue to post her and there with new reviews of Rarity from the Hollow or subsequent release, my recommendation is to not expect much except ego centrism, a waste of your time with respect to sales, but don’t be discouraged, Margaret, Maybe, so far, your work has not been recognized by anyone that actually counts. If there is something in your 11 titles worth noting, it will. If not, please keep on writing. I have received glowing reviews by people that count for Rarity from the Hollow, but sales have been low. It’s okay. It is history beyond my too soon demise that counts. The only thing that I feel a little guilty about, since I tried so hard, not just writing, that was easy, but with promotions, was that I didn’t raise more money to prevent child abuse, the mission of Lacy Dawn Adventures. This very popular guy, John Scalzi, ruined my reputation by his ignorance of this mission, compounded by a guy with the same name, Bob Eggleton, that I didn’t know was involved in the genre. He had the same name as me, so I was force to change mine. Scalzi posted comment like I was a fraud, even though I’d never heard of the other “Bob.” in 2006 when my first novel was originally published. Good stuff has happened since, but I recommend that you search your name an avoid the same pitfalls that name can impact. Good luck and please be real! If you produce something worth recognition by a non-paid professional editor, I will check it out. I am not interested in reader reviews, self promotion, or anything that has cost you one penny to publish for any reason — that’s not how true art works.

      Love, bob, now robert.

      Like

  9. I’m an Australian writer with eleven titles published. My new release, ‘Love, Desire and Betrayal’ is getting very good reviews on Amazon and Goodreads. I have a blog about Australian birds, flowers and general items.

    Like

  10. I’m an Australian writer with eleven titles published. My new release, ‘Love, Desire and Betrayal’ is getting very good reviews on Amazon and Goodreads. I have a blog about Australian birds, flowers and general items.

    Like

  11. what an awesome idea Jodie! I did an indie author profile series on one of my blogs last years, and I’ll set set something like this on my other one! So – to be shameless: I’ve published 2 books under Holly Kerr Baby! Baby? Baby?! and Coming Home. Both are women’s fiction/chick-lit. I am currently working on my third, hopefully to be released by the end of the year. Baby! is self-published, Coming Home is published by a small press. I’m in the process of re-releasing my Baby! with a new title (Unexpecting) and a new cover so check that out on my holly blog http://hollykerr.ca/ I also do a weekly – WWW Wednesday – What I’m Reading, and always looking for more readers to join in.
    Along with those, I also self-publish a series of erotic romance under the name Anna Ellis and OMG it’s fun to write! Check out my Husbands and Wives series, available for your kindle – my latest is a set of short stories about a group of swinging neighbours – Interludes II. All the info is on my Anna blog http://annaellisauthor.wordpress.com/
    Thanks again Jodie for doing this! Good luck to everyone!

    Like

  12. syddent says:

    Thanks for this Jodie.
    I am working and publishing a sci fi novel “The Recruiting Matter” here
    http://syddent.wordpress.com/the-recruiting-matter/

    It features a off world alien who does trading; steam punk engineers; a rather devious villain; a sarcastic computer; and some fairly decent dialog (if I say so myself).
    Millicent (the off world trader) has landed on Earth to, once again, get some cool things and sign some “down on their luck” recent graduates in the sciences for some off world work. But Millicent finds she now has a competitor (that is against the rules!) and the competitor is tricking and torturing people. Now she has to figure out how get her people and make this annoying competitor regret he ever crossed her.

    I am hoping for more people to read and comment to improve the story.

    Like

  13. Thanks for this opportunity, Jodie. I’ve published an anthology called Written Across the Genres available on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Written-Across-Genres-Julaina-Kleist-Corwin/dp/1937303217/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1411529123&sr=8-1-fkmr0&keywords=julaina+kleist
    My blog is about writing and I create short posts almost every day.http://www.timetowritenow.com

    Like

  14. K. Caffee says:

    Agree with just about everyone above! Thank you for the opportunity to leave a note about my work. I have a series in progress – first book out on Amazon (But, if you stop by my blog you can get the kindle version free from Smashwords) and plans to get book two of the series out later this year.

    I also have several shorts relating to pukah and how they have influenced different parts of my life. Right now, I am kind of restructuring the types of posts I put out so that there are at least three distinct themes (and if I can get far enough ahead, I’d like to open that up to four) revolving around the animals that have been with me through life, a discussion about the published book, and past jobs that I have held down. Sometimes it is humdrum, other times it can be more exciting. There are some other miscellaneous articles mixed in, but these seem to be the themes so far. Once I am out of classes, I intend to begin threading in reviews of books I have read as well, but those probably won’t be on any set schedule unless I get very, very lucky!

    Please, if any of this interests you, stop by http://pukahworks.wordpress.com/category/k-caffee/ and take a look around!

    Like

  15. T says:

    WOW. Good on you, as the Kiwis say in New Zealand. I look forward to visiting when I can. Peace. T

    Like

  16. The most enjoyable science fiction novel I have read in several years

    Rarity from the Hollow by Robert Eggleton is the most enjoyable science fiction novel I have read in several years. Who could think of an intergalactic handbook for entrepreneurs? Who could turn a tree-hugger into a paranormal event of death-defying significance? Who could create characters so believable, so funny, so astonishingly human (and not)?

    Robert Eggleton, that’s who.

    I put this book on my IPhone, and it followed me everywhere for several days. Strangers smiled politely at my unexpected laughter in the men’s room toilet stall. They looked away as I emerged, waving the IPhone at them as if it might explain something significant.

    Oddly, the novel explains a great deal that has become significant in our society. Rarity from the Hollow is satire at its best and highest level. It is a psychological thriller, true to traits of mankind (and other species). It is an animal rights dissertation (you will laugh when you understand why I write that). It celebrates the vilest insect on earth (make that Universe).

    The characters created by Robert Eggleton will bug your brain long after you smoke, uh, read the final page. Thanks for the laughs, the serious thoughts, the absolute wonder of your mind, Mr. Eggleton. A truly magnificent job.

    You have my permission to use this however you see fit, with the following attribution:
    Temple Emmet Williams, Author, former Reader’s Digest editor

    http://warriorpatient.com/blog/2015/05/18/58/

    5-18-15

    Like

  17. Brian Bailie Jr. says:

    Thanks Jodie! My new novel “The Rightful Heir” is now available for Kindle- http://amzn.to/1HYuDJw and Nook-http://bit.ly/1Jo6Ln8 I hope everyone will enjoy it! You can preview the first three chapters on Amazon.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s